Posts tagged ‘identity’

Yet Another Identity Stealing Bug. Will Creeping Normalcy be the Result?

Elie Bursztein points me to a “Cross Site URL Hijacking” attack which, among other things, allows a website to identify a visitor instantly (if they are using Firefox) by finding their Google and possibly Facebook IDs. Here is a live demo and here’s a paper.

For the security geeks, the attack works by exploiting a Firefox bug that allows a page in the attacker domain to infer URLs of pages in the target domain. If a page like target.com/home redirects to target.com/?user=[username] (which is quite common), the attacker can learn the username by requesting the page target.com/home in a script tag.

Let us put this attack in context. Stealing the identity of a web visitor should be familiar to readers of this blog. I’ve recently written about doing this via history stealing, then a bug in Google spreadsheets, and now we have this. While the spreadsheets bug was fixed, the history stealing vulnerability remains in most browsers. Will new bugs be found faster than existing ones getting fixed? The answer is probably yes.

Something that is of much more concern in the long run is Facebook’s instant personalization, which is basically like identity stealing, except it is a feature rather than a bug. Currently Facebook identities are available without user consent to only 3 partners (Yelp, Pandora and docs.com) but there will be inevitable competitive pressures both for Facebook to open this up to more websites as well as for other identity providers to offer a similar service.

Legitimate methods and hacks based on bugs are not entirely distinct. Two XSS attacks on yelp.com were found in quick succession either of which could have been exploited by a third (fourth?) party for identity stealing. Instant personalization (and similar attempts at an “identity layer”) greatly increase the chance of bugs that leak your identity to every website, authorized or not.

As identity-stealing bugs as well as identity-sharing features proliferate, the result is going to be creeping normalcy — users will get slowly inured to the idea that any website they visit might have their identity. And that will be a profound change for the way the web works. Of course, savvy users will know how to turn off the various tracking mechanisms, but most people will be left in the lurch.

We are still at the early stages of this shift. It is clear that it will have both good and ill effects. For example, people are much more civil when interacting under their real-life identity. For this reason, there is quite a clamor for identity. For instance, see News Sites Rethink Anonymous Online Comments and The Forces Align Against Anonymity. But like every change, this one is going to be hard to get used to.

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June 1, 2010 at 9:38 am 2 comments


About 33bits.org

I'm an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton. I research (and teach) information privacy and security, and moonlight in technology policy.

This is a blog about my research on breaking data anonymization, and more broadly about information privacy, law and policy.

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